Alberta’s largest-known bat hibernation site

The Wildlife Conservation Society Canada and Alberta Environment and Parks announced today the discovery last month of the largest Alberta bat hibernation site (based on estimated bat count) ever recorded outside of the Rocky Mountains.

The newly-discovered  is being used as a hibernaculum by at least 200 Little Brown Myotis bats, listed as Endangered under Canada’s Species at Risk Act. Formed by weak sulphuric acid dissolving bedrock, conditions in the narrow, muddy cave make it impossible to fully inspect hand-sized pockets, cracks and fissures that compose roosting sites. “This means population numbers could be significantly higher,” suggests Dave Hobson, Senior Wildlife Biologist of Alberta Environment and Parks.

Said Dave Critchley of the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT), who co-coordinates WCS Canada’s BatCaver program in Alberta, and was one of the cave explorers: “Finding a cave in Alberta’s boreal forest inhabited by several hundred bats is a real breakthrough. It demonstrates that this kind of bat habitat may well exist in other non-mountainous areas throughout the .”

Said Shannon Phillips, Minister of Environment and Parks: “This is a fascinating and important find. Understanding where Alberta’s different bat species are living is a crucial part in preventing the spread of white-nose syndrome and in protecting sensitive habitats.”

Read More at Phys Org

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